Comment: The Functional High Ground

In case you did not notice: in the last months, torches and pitchforks have been held steady in the Apple developer community. People have been furious about the inexplicable and arbitrary rejections of high-profile and / or innovative apps, e.g. Transmit, PCalc and Nintype.

While this particular turmoil seemed to cool down in the last week(s), another topic that has been on the radar for quite some time has been in discussion: The recent decline in Apple’s software quality. Marco Arment hit the nail on the head for a lot of people, myself included, although Daniel Jalkut puts some statements in a more rational perspective.
Additional link: Craig Hockenberry has written another great piece.

Since the launch of iOS 7, the number of people asking me for help or complaining about their Apple-devices has increased significantly.
People are pissed.

This post is written on OS X Mavericks, because I still hear about problems with WiFi on Yosemite. And because the new features just are not worth the risk of the slightest instability to me.

The #1 reason I am not using FreeBSD or PCBSD on my laptop is OS X’s reliability I learned to love since I switched to the Mac around five years ago. And the software I use on a daily basis, which is in my opinion far superior to everything I have seen on other platforms. In short, OS X still is my favorite UNIX desktop.

I would not consider myself an iOS power user. Sure, I use the device quite a lot but it’s nothing all-too fancy: podcasts, OmniFocus, Twitter, navigation and occassionally messaging although I hate typing on the phone. And some annoying bugs along with the restrictions you still have on iOS make me feel tired of the platform.

I tend to agree that Apple’s hardware is amazing – my laptop delights me every day and so does my phone and my tablet.

But it is not hardware quality that convinced me to buy Apple products in the first place. And it is definitely not the attempt to build a platform with inferior Maps, windy Clouds, locked-down devices and rushed-through software releases.

I do not care about Apple doing well economically. As a company, profit will always be the highest priority for them. No matter what. However, it is important to have a long-term strategy for your products.

I want need that strategy to be: making the most reliable operating system there is with the most advanced technologies available that are suitable for the job.

Everything else, I’m out. Sooner or later.